Posts tagged ‘Technology’

Creating Google HyperDocs and Multimedia Sets

“Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun” by Mary Lou Cook

A HyperDoc is a Google document that incorporates different interactive features, such as links to content, maps etc. It requires the creator to think about the needs of the learners, how they will engage in the content, what ways they can reflect on their own learning, and how they can show what they know. A multimedia text set is a collection of lessons, various texts, and resources based around a unit, topic or theme. HyperDocs and Multimedia text sets were created by three ladies, Lisa Highfill, Kelly Hilton and Sarah Landis and have revolutionized the classroom.

How to create a HyperDoc:

  1. Choose your audience (students, teachers, staff)
  2. Choose a standard/topic/theme/unit 
  3. Decide if it is a single lesson (HyperDoc) or a collection of learning resources, example for a unit (Multimedia Text Set)
  4. Create a doc and title it HyperDoc and name of standard/topic/theme/unit
  5. Add images, links, maps, instructions, learning experiences etc 
  6. Be sure to set the share settings to view only so leaners can make a copy.
  7. There are multiple places to share your HyperDoc with other educators such as the below padlet or to Teachers Give Teachers.

HyperDocs are a great way to create personalized learning playlists and/or pathways. It is also a misconception that only teachers can create/use HyperDocs. It is a great way for administrators to model a way to integrate technology in a meaningful way for example in staff meetings or as a way to deliver professional development. Check out this link for HyperDocs for Administrators!

Made with Padlet

 

More resources on HyperDoc’s:

The HyperDoc Handbook: Digital Lesson Design Using Google Apps

Meet the HyperDoc Girls and Their Resources

HyperDocs Site

Collection of HyperDoc Examples from 2nd-12

Collection of Multimedia Text Sets

Creating Sticky Notes with Google Slides

“Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.” Edward de Bono

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This week my blog post is different because I want you to read Tony Vincent‘s blog post, Print Custom Sticky Notes with Google Slides. It is chock full of amazing ideas, tips, tricks and templates for you to utilize in your classroom. The directions are clear, concise and so easy you could implement this tomorrow in your classroom. Happy reading!

Top 10 New Tools from #NCTIES17

“Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun” Mary Lou Cook

NCTIES is one of my favorite conference each year. I love learning new things and sparking new ideas to share with others. Here are 10 new tools I learned about that I have not used before but will be using in the classroom: (These are in no particular order)

  1. Quick, Draw:  This is a game built with machine learning. You draw, and a neural network tries to guess what you’re drawing. The machine guessed 4/6 of my drawings.
  2. Bloxels for Kids: This is an innovative video game development platform that allows you to create your own video games. I love that it is created by kids for kids.
  3. Sutori:  This is a place students can create their own digital story timelines.
  4. Post it Plus App: Take a picture of the post-its that you were using to brainstorm/collaborate and save it as a picture. You can then later rearrange or add to it.
  5. Phonto: Add text to photo’s…so many great ways to use this in the classroom.
  6. Quizalize: Similar to Kahoot but what I like about more is students can take it at their own pace. 
  7. Vizia: This site makes a quiz from any video, sends answers to a spreadsheet!
  8. Inklewriter: Create your own choose your adventure story. 
  9. OpeneBooks: This site, once you create an account, offers free ebooks for students.
  10. Teach Your Monster to Read: This site is great for the younger students and ESL students.

*Bonus: Richard Byrne shared all his presentation slides here from the conference as well.

Teaching How to Spot Fake News

“Life is filled with tests, one after another, and if you don’t recognize them, you are certain to fail the most important ones.” By Brian Herbert

fake

In a  recent study from Stanford, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning, displays that a vast majority of students can’t determine it what they read on websites is true or false. (I would also be interested in a further study to see how many adults can identify fake news as sometimes I see adults posting fake news too.) The skills of evaluating fake news and information are a very important part of Digital Citizenship and Digital Literacy. 

As educators we need to have an understanding ourselves where information comes from so we can help guide students. We need to explicitly teach if an article, blog post etc is reliable and accurate. We can start doing that be utilizing these three core ideas: 

Consider the Source: Where was the information published? Remember anyone can make a website.

Check the Author: What do you know about the author(s)? What else have they written?

Check the Date: When was the information posted? How long ago was it updated? 

Below are some resources you can use in the classroom for teaching how to spot fake news:

Chrome Extension: Fake News Detector 

Snopes (Put in a url you are wondering about and they will fact check it)

Fictitious, Satirical, Bogus, Fallacy-laden Websites (Sites that are fake you can use to teach students about digital literacy and spotting fake news. I would make this into a web-quest mixing real and fake news to see how many they can identify)

Lesson Plan: Fighting Fake News

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news

Fake News and What We Can Do about It: HS Lesson Plans

More articles on fake news:

Mission Critical: How Educators Can Help Save Democracy

Who Stands Between Fake News and Students? Educators

Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World: Ideas for Teaching and Learning About Fake News

Most Students Don’t Know When News Is Fake, Stanford Study Finds

How to Spot Fake News

411 on Makerspaces

“The mind has exactly the same power as the hands; not merely to grasp the world but to change it.” By Colin Wilson

A Makerspace is a learning environment where everyone can discover, collaborate, and create things. It is not defined as a certain space but rather an area of exploration, experimentation and tinkering. Many schools have been adding Makerspaces into their media centers but that is not the only place they have to be. You can add them into your classroom as well. There is a misconception that Makerspaces have to have technology such as a 3d printer and this is not true. I have seen many awesome Makerspaces with no technology in them such as Fashion Makerspaces. Ask parents to donate supplies or apply for a grants through Donors Choose or Go Fund Me: Education to help launch your Makerspace.

Here are some examples items you can put into your Makerspaces but not limited too:

Helpful Articles and Resources:

www.makerspaces.com

7 Things You Should Know About Makerspaces

Book: Invent to Learn

My previous Makerspace posts:

Makerspace in Education

Ways to Use Blokify – Without a 3D Printer in the Classroom

Adding Creativity and Imagination to the Classroom

I would love to hear what you put into your Makerspaces.

Hour of Code 2016

“An understanding of computer science is becoming increasingly essential in today’s world. Our national competitiveness depends upon our ability to educate our children—and that includes our girls—in this critical field.” By Sheryl Sandberg

It is that time of year again where I love to remind and promote Hour of Code to all educators. This year the Hour of Code is the week of December 5-11, 2017. The Hour of Code is a global movement hosted by Computer Science Education Week and Code.org reaching millions of students, in over a 100 countries from K-12th grade. The concept is simple, it gives students an one-hour introduction to computer science and computer programming.

In North Carolina alone there are 16,919 open computing jobs (4.7x the state average demand rate) with only 1,224 computer science graduates. You can learn more about how you can support North Carolina Computer Science here or about any other state here.

More great resources:

Apple is offering FREE Hour of Code Workshops

10 projects to kickstart Hour of Code

Hour of Code with Kodable

Here are my previous years blog posts on Hour of Code along with other Computer Science blog posts that have helpful resources:

Resources for CS EdWeek 2015

Hour of Code

The Foos: Kids Coding App

Using Kodable App in the Classroom

Bridging Coding and Common Core with Tynker

I hope all of you give your students the opportunity to see what coding and computer science is all about! You don’t have to know how to code or anything about computer science to provide students the spark to get them excited about learning computer science!

My Top 3 To-Do List Tools

“Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.” A. A. Milne

Below are my top FREE to-do list tools! All the tools are simple to use and work on all devices. I like to model how to use these tools and incorporate them into the classroom through different projects. This allows students to decide which one they like best for themselves.

  1. Google Keep: I love Google Keep because it is fast and flexible. You can set reminders and color code your to-do lists. There is also a new Google Keep extension which allows you to save the things that you find to Keep in a single click. This is a great new feature especially for your students when they are researching as they can save their websites in one click. Here is my previous blog post on Google Keep from a few years ago….yes and I still use it!
  2. Trello: I like Trello when working on big projects with a group of people. You can add comments, attachments etc to the Trello cards. You can create timelines and checklists for different parts of the project but it is all housed together on one board.
  3. Wunderlist:  I like using this one as a way of breaking down large projects/tasks into smaller chunks for individual students. I used to do this for students and put it on their desks or in their agenda. Putting the chunks on the app makes it much more desecrate.

These are just a few of the ways you can use any of these tools in the classroom.

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