Posts tagged ‘entrepreneurship’

Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

“Logic will get you from A to B. Imagination will take you everywhere.” by Albert Einstein

Guest Blog Post by: Dylan Schreiner 

Whether people like to admit it or not, entrepreneurship involves everyone. Even professionals not commonly thought of as being business related. For example, an artist is still an entrepreneur due to the fact that he or she needs to sell their art or put on a show at a venue. No matter where you look, entrepreneurship can relate. Such is why, I believe teachers should focus on implementing entrepreneurial activities into their subjects. Involvement with entrepreneurship teaches people firsthand life skills applicable to whatever field they choose. Specifically, having entrepreneurial activities and projects allow incredible learning that translates to real world experience. 

A project might involve raising funds or awareness for charity. For example, after learning about the risks of smoking in “Life Management” class, the students could attempt to spread awareness through email marketing.  They could use graphic design in “art class,”  marketing fundamentals learned in “economics class” and analytics learned in “math class.”  This is just one example that illustrates the point.

The following are some benefits of such a system:

1. Teaches how to better work in groups

All too often in group projects, one person carries the group by doing a majority of the work. Instead, by having projects where students can choose their roles and what they’re passionate about, they become more invested. Also, even if one role gets filled, a person gets to learn how to do something new and thereby increase their skill set.

2. Give students marketable skills and experience

One huge limiting factor for students just entering the workforce, whether for a summer job/internship or a full time job, relates to experience. It’s almost as if a cycle exists by which lack of experience inhibits getting a job, but then students are stuck with no experience because they can’t get a job. Therefore, by creating projects with market potential and real world experience, graduates truly enter the job market ahead of the pack.

For example, if students were able to develop a product and were able to bring it to market, the experience gained through that entire process would make them more sought out by employers. . If that product were, let’s say a mobile phone application, the students involved in coding the application would also be sought after by potential employers. This idea even works for the arts. What English department or publishing company wouldn’t want a student with experience in marketing something? After all, sometimes the hardest part is selling your art.

3. Provides a well-rounded education

Think about it. How often do students in one college or area of study interact with those in another? Often, in college, all of the business majors group together and all of the engineers do the same. Even in high school, the AP and IB students are in a group of their own. Wouldn’t it be great if these students learned how to collaborate and gained a better understanding for the passions of one another? Doing so creates a society of well-rounded people adaptive to their environments.For example, working on projects that rely on creativity, adaptability and surviving change really sets someone up with the skills needed to be successful almost anywhere.

Overall, I hope to have interested you enough to think about including entrepreneurial activities in your school or classroom. Though, the article only includes some of the many benefits and reasons behind such an idea. Look out for continuation on this discussion in the future!

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