Posts tagged ‘educational books’

Five Must Have Math Books to Add to Your Shelf

“The essence of mathematics lies in its freedom.” by Georg Cantor

Math.jpg

A few weeks ago I wrote, Five Must Have Literacy Books to Add to Your Shelf and was asked by many educators what do I like for Math. Below are five of my favorite books (in no particular order) to help improve math instruction.

  1. Mathematical Mindsets: Unleashing Students’ Potential through Creative Math, Inspiring Messages and Innovative Teaching by Jo Boaler

  2. Visible Learning for Mathematics, Grades K-12: What Works Best to Optimize Student Learning  by John A. Hattie, Douglas B. Fisher, Nancy Frey 

  3. Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematical Success for All by NCTM

  4. What’s Math Got to Do with It?: How Teachers and Parents Can Transform Mathematics Learning and Inspire Success by Jo Boaler

  5. Making Number Talks Matter: Developing Mathematical Practices and Deepening Understanding by Cathy Humphreys, Ruth Parker

If there is a math book you think that should be added to this list, please add it in the comments section, as I am always wanting to build my toolkit and book list.

Transforming Literacy Practices with Digital Tools

“Technology can and should be used as a tool to open the classroom to the world, to ensure that teachers present standards in a way that fosters active engagement and participation in meaningful ways.” – from Pencils to Podcasts 

Guest blog post by Katie Stover

Who knew what started as a partnership between my education students at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina and Lindsay Yearta’s fifth graders in Rock Hill, South Carolina would become a catalyst for a larger endeavor. In 2013, both groups of students read Linda Sue Park’s novel, A Long Walk to Water  and used Kid Blog as a platform for ongoing conversation about the book. This digital book club enhanced the fifth graders’ motivation and engagement in reading while providing the preservice teachers with a hands-on experience working with elementary-aged learners. The online reader response provided the preservice teachers with authentic assessment and instructional opportunities without having to physically be present in the classroom. They used students’ written responses as a springboard for online conversation about the shared text. The preservice teachers modeled proficient reader strategies like connecting, predicting, and inferring. They then probed and engaged the fifth graders through questioning to elicit deeper comprehension and discussion of the text.

When sharing about this mutually beneficial blogging partnership at the International Literacy Conference in 2014, we were asked by Solution Tree Publishers to consider writing a book about ways to integrate technology into teaching and learning. Fast forward two years later and we are thrilled to announce our new book titled, From Pencils to Podcasts: Digital Tools to Transform K-6 Literacy Practices will be released at the end of August. In this book, we share more about the online book club as well as over a dozen other suggestions for embedding technology into the curriculum to prepare students to meet the demands of the 21st century. We offer practical suggestions for integrating digital tools into familiar literacy practices to facilitate comprehension, evaluation, publication, and assessment. Each chapter provides a vignette, easy-to-use digital tools, step by step instructions for getting started as well as authentic classroom examples and suggestions for adapting across content areas.

We would love to hear from you as you try out and adapt any ideas from the book in your own schools!  Our Twitter handles are: Katie Stover @kstover24 and Lindsay Yearta @lyearta 

From Pencils to Podcasts

Join #21stedchat on October 2nd, 2017 @ 8:00 EST PM with @edu_thompson and @dprindle with guest host @kstover24 as we discuss the book From Pencils to Podcasts: Digital Tools to Transform K-6 Literacy Practices 

To read more about the blogging partnership and other publications by Katie Stover, visit https://furman.academia.edu/KatieStover.

Also check out another great book coauthored by Katie Stover, Smuggling Writing: Strategies That Get Students to Write Every Day, in Every Content Area, Grades 3-12

 

 

My Summer Reading List 2016

“Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.” by Malala Yousafzai

With another school year coming to a close; I have created my book list for my summer reading. Below are the books I will be reading this summer in no particular order:

Currently reading (with one chapter left) and I highly reccommend: Passionate Learners: How to Engage and Empower Your Students by Pernille Ripp

 

  1. Understanding How Young Children Learn: Bringing the Science of Child Development to the Classroom by Wendy L. Ostroff
  2. Leadership: Key Competencies for Whole-System Change by Lyle Kirtman and Michael Fullan
  3. Learning to Choose, Choosing to Learn: The Key to Student Motivation and Achievement by Mike Anderson

Below are books I have read recently that I recommend for your summer reading list if you have not read them yet!

The Innovator’s Mindset: Empower Learning, Unleash Talent, and Lead a Culture of Creativity by George Couros

The Reading Strategies Book: Your Everything Guide to Developing Skilled Readers  by Jennifer Serravallo

Please add titles you are reading in the comment section as I love adding books to my reading list!

My Favorite Education Books (Right Now)

“Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.” By John Locke

book pic

I am forever reading, sometimes I rather be reading on a Friday night then going out with friends. Okay truth be told a lot of the times because by Friday I am dead tired from the week. But in all honesty, I love books and I am always reading at least two, a fun personal read and an education book. I often get asked what are some of my favorite books in education are when talking with educators so I decided todays post would be a dedication to my favorite education books I LOVE right now.

1. Leverage Leadership: A Practical Guide to Building Exceptional Schools by Paul Bambrick-Santoyo

2. Soup: A Recipe to Nourish Your Team and Culture by Jon Gordan

3. Sparking Student Creativity: Practical Ways to Promote Innovative Thinking and Problem Solving by Patti Drapeau

4. Never Underestimate Your Teachers: Instructional Leadership for Excellence in Every Classroom by Robyn Jackson

5. The Third Teacher by OWP/P Architects, VS Furniture, Bruce Mau Design, OWP/P Architects

I would love to know your favorite education books as I am always looking to add to my list. Please leave your favorites in the comment section.

Key Ideas from #ASCDL2L Keynote: Jerry Weast

“Collaboration is the best way to work. It’s only way to work, really. Everyone’s there because they have a set of skills to offer across the board.” By Antony Starr

L2L-left

This week I attended one of my favorite conferences, ASCD Leader to Leader (#ASCDL2L). This conference is one of my favorite because it is different. It is invitation only and there are educators from all over the world and from different aspects of education. You sit in groups verse rows and have lots of time to collaborate and discuss topics that you are interested in. These groups are mixed up of superintendents to teachers and everything in-between but you never know who does what (unless you ask) as everyone is treated equally and there is no “ladder” or status hierarchy. This year we had Jerry Weast as the keynote. Mr. Weast is a long time educator and served in all different facets and is now retired but continues to practice his knowledge with Partnership For Deliberate Excellence (P4DE). Below are my key ideas from his keynote:

  • Lead by dancing rather than pushing, work together not against one another
  • What is the problem you are trying to solve, whats getting in the way of your progress? What are the conditions necessary to solve it?
  • Change the culture of learning and teaching
  • What must I do to move this organization/school/work?
    • Know you will be a target and it hurts but it is worth the pain for change
    • Run toward the problem….not away from
    • Quality vs Time – what can you do to bend the curve so you get results?
  • Study Human Behavior as it explains a lot
  • Stages of Change : Organization Maturity Model to Increase Performance
    1. Discover Existing Condition
    2. Commit to Predictive Gateways
    3. Evaluate Effectiveness
    4. Engage and Empower
    5. Innovate and monitor
  • Make sure your cost effort is equaling the impact or scrap it
  • Have effective benchmarks
  • Before asking what to add for the change to occur, ask what you can off-load to move a school to change.
  • When managing complex change you need to have five things:
    1. Vision
    2. Skills
    3. Incentives
    4. Resources
    5. Action plan
  •  If you don’t then….
    • No Vision = Confusion
    • No  Skills = anxiety
    • No Incentives = gradual change
    • No Resources = frustration
    • No action plan = false start
  • Start looking in the mirror and develop yourself and your leadership skills, because you can’t make a difference if you don’t know yourself.
  • If you don’t get the outcomes, what are you going to do differently?
  • Somehow it seems the world is having more effect on me, then I am having on the world…don’t let this happen.
  • Four themes to develop for effective leadership: Trust, Culture, Listen to Understand and Clarity.
  • Books he recommends to read: NudgeTribes, Improbable Scholar

 

My Learnings Digested from #ISTE2014

“Actions speak louder than buzzwords. ” Adam Bellows

ISTE2014 Bound

ISTE2014 Bound

It is hard to believe a week ago I was at #ISTE2014 with 16,039 conference goers, from all 50 states along with 67 nations! It has taken me some time to process and digest what I learned from the conference that is now a check off my bucket list!

Top 3 Takeaways:

1. I want to be like Kevin Carroll! Why? He believed in himself, he was a change agent and a catalyst. By far  Kevin’s keynote was the most inspirational and best session I attended. His keynote speech has not been released yet but when it does, if you have not seen it, you need too. Here is a quick interview with him: Kevin Carroll at ISTE 2014 and his book: Rules of the Red Rubber Ball

2. Relationships and collaboration of ideas are the most important part of learning. My second favorite part about ISTE was the people, sharing ideas in lines, at meals and at events. I loved meeting my virtual PLN face to face and collaborating with educators from my own district that I don’t get to see so often and ones that I do!

3.  There is a lot of misconceptions about what Personalized Learning is. Personalized Learning encompasses many best practices that teachers already do such as conferring/conferencing with students, build relationships and allowing students to own their learning. What it is NOT: Personalized Learning does not mean technology. Technology is a tool to help the instructional shift that needs to be made in the classroom. There is no one Learning Management System (LMS), web tool, app or device that is the magic bullet for personalized leaning.

Top 3 Websites to check out:

1. Tackk : is a simple way to create beautiful pages on the web. It’s your very own page, flyer, blog post, or poster.

2. Graphite: Is a great site by Common Sense Media  that make it easier for educators to find the best apps, games, and websites for the classroom, making sure they are common core aligned and the rigor and relevance is there.

3.  Tammy Wocester : I used to visit Tammy’s site often a few years ago as I loved her ideas. I am glad I went to her session and was reminded how great it is.

Top 3 ideas to implement: 

1. #youmatter: I have heard about you matter by watching the TED talk but going to the session helped me realize it’s about personalizing the students learning through whole child approach. It is a movement. Here are more sites to add to your #youmatter resources:  http://choose2matter.org,  http://www.classroomchampions.org  and you matter day using #mattergrams

2. App Speed Dating: Is where students teach educators about apps they like to use in the classroom.  A great way to offer PD to teachers and allow student leadership.

3. Edtechwomen: One of the events I went to at ISTE was the #edtechwomen dinner. It was a favorite for me as I was inspired by so many amazing women; learning about their stories and journeys. I also learned the most about myself during this event as I never realized how much I ‘downgrade’ things I have accomplished in my life, such as when I introduced myself, I stated what my job was but I neglected to also state that I own my own company. That is something that is apart of me that I don’t share often enough, yet it is a huge accomplishment. I am slowly learning that I need to be proud of all that I have done. I’m in the process of starting a chapter of #edtechwomen for the charlotte area. Once I learn more I will be sure to share as I hope you will be involved and yes, men are welcome as they are our ‘malallies’ – male + allies.

Other great reflections and posts from ISTE2014:

Anibal Pacheco’s – Interviews w/ Presenters and Special Guests

Erin Klein’s: Reflections from #iste2014

Rafranz DavisPassion Fueled Connection

Lisa Pagano’s: Beginning to Process #iste2014

ISTE 2014 Sessions with Published Handout Links

Google Doc: ISTE 2014 Session Notes

Melissa  Edwards Reflections

If you would like to experience #iste2015 in Philly you can start checking out ISTE’s site.

Book Review: The One Thing

“My goal is no longer to get more done, but rather less to do.” By Francine Joy

One of the books for my summer reading was, The One Thing by Gary Keller and Jay Papasan, and it has been a game changer for me. I read the book in a matter of a few days as it is a very easy read. I haven’t highlighted and placed post-it notes all over a book like this in a long time.  Watch this quick clip to get the essence of the book.

Why game changer? It hit home with me and offered practical advice and tips. I have now completed the book for about three weeks and I have seen a significant difference in my life.

1. I have more time, not because I am doing less work but I am making sure my choices have purpose, meaning and significance.

2. Instead of saying, “yes I will do that” – which like the book stated was my default mode. I am thinking about what I would be saying no to.

3. I am not multitasking anymore as I see how I am not truly as effective. I am ‘time blocking’ and seeing how much more productive I am.

I learned a lot more but these are the three takeaways that I think have been the most significant. Check out The One Things You Tube Channel as they have some great resources as well.

Other Reviews:

The One Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results

Good Reads: The One Thing

I hope you add it to your summer reading list and enjoy it as much as I have!

 

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