Posts tagged ‘Common Core’

#NCTIES16 Round Up

“Leadership provides the vehicle for others to generate ideas!” By @PrincipalKafele 

One of my favorite conferences every year is #NCTIES. Below I have done a round up of resources from the sessions I  attended in no particular order that you can now look at and utilize in your classroom.

Best of the Web 2016 by Richard Byrne

Mobile Apps in Common Core Aligned ELA & Social Studies Lessons by Richard Byrne

Teaching “Wired” Learners by  Kevin Honeycutt

  • Use a video as an opportunity to narrate a story
  • Student Created Products
  • Quotes from Honeycutt that are meaningful:
    • Stop finding reasons to fail
    • Help students understand the transformational power of tech
    • The only cavalry that will save you is you!
    • People protect and support what they are proud of – tell the stories of success
      • People won’t attack stories about student success
    • Your biggest weakness is your biggest strength, ready to be told well.
    • Emotion cements learning

Sketchnoting in Classroom by Kathy Schrock
Global Collaboration (To Fit Your Needs) by Pernille Ripp

S.T.E.A.M Powered PBL for K/1 by Jill Zsuppan and Heather Surgen

Other random things I picked up:

  • Create a “You Matter Wall” have your kiddos write thoughtful messages to other students, teachers, family members, etc

  • Your plan and reality are not always the same!

  • Use the square root of your staff to find the number of staff to find momentum to see change in the classroom, coaching is a must

  • “We don’t need consensus  – we need momentum”

  • “What is the evidence that I am the instructional leader of my school?”

  • Stop and review your game film.  Is what you are doing making a difference for our students?

 

 

Abbott and Castello Problem Solving Tasks

“We can not solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them” By Albert Einstein

I love using the below Abbott and Castello videos in the classroom because they are a great way to link problem solving and digital literacy plus give them a little history! (Like how I rhymed there ;-))  Here is how I have utilized them as tasks for the students.

Who’s on First: I do a ‘close read’ style  lesson for this task. First, I have them listen to it once without the diagram, the second time they get a blank baseball diamond to fill out as best they can. The third time they listen to it as many times as they want until they feel like they have it. (This allows them to close read with digital literacy) Once they have it completed they partner up and discuss. I then have a solution station for them to check out how well they did. I also recently came across the book Who’s on First (Thank you Danielle) which I would add to the solution station.

Abbott & Costello 7 x 13 = 28: For this video I have the students help out Abbott & Costello by creating a video skit explaining why 7 x 13 is not 28 three different ways. I give them a story map to guide the students to make sure they have the content before they record the video.

Abbott & Costello Two Tens for a Five: For this video task I have the students help out Abbott & Costello by either writing a letter or creating a book explaining what is happening.

If you have any Abbott & Costello videos you have utilized in the classroom as a task for students, I would love to add it to my list! Please share in the comments.

 

 

Build a ‘Shark Tank Show’ in Your Classroom

“Innovation is change that unlocks new value” By Jamie Notter

shark

The TV show ‘Shark Tank’ gives entrepreneurs an opportunity to sell a business idea to millionaire entrepreneurs in only a few minutes. One day when watching the show I thought ‘why couldn’t we take this idea and add it into the classroom?’ That is when I started brainstorming different ways to use the ‘Shark Tank’ framework to bring in more student ownership into the classroom. I soon realized I have been doing a version of ‘Shark Tank’ in my classroom before Shark Tank was invented!

Each year in my math class, students were put into groups and had to design a theme park. This project lasted all year long and for each standard/skill, they had a different piece to complete. For example, area and perimeter: The students had to mathematically figure out how to best utilize their blueprint to fit the rides and also think about the ‘flow’ of the park etc. For each standard/skill I had a guest speaker that was an expert that came to talk to the class. For example, for the theme park design, I was able to get the designer that helped build Carowinds to come and speak to the students about the flow. At the end of the year, the students had to create a presentation and ‘sell’ their theme park as the best. The judges were each of the guest speakers that came to speak to the class throughout the year. (The students didn’t know that the guest speakers were going to be the judges until the day of.)

The ‘Shark Tank’ framework marries well with Project/Problem Based Learning (PBL’s) as a way to present their findings/outcomes. It also aligns to many of the Common Core Standards for ELA from K-12 such as listening and speaking. Here are a few other ideas of how to add in the ‘Shark Tank framework into your classroom:

1. Shark Tank: Book Report: The students job is to create a “Shark Tank” sales pitch on a book to the class that they choose to ‘sell’. The idea is that you want to contain enough information about the book that will interest and excite the potential reader without giving away the entire plot – so they will ‘buy’ it (read it). Check out this Shark Tank Book Report.

2. Shark Tank: Prototypes: The students job is to create a “Shark Tank” sales pitch to ‘sell’ their prototype/invention/business.

3. Shark Tank: Periodic Table: The students job is to create a “Shark Tank” sales pitch to ‘sell’ their element as the best.

I would love to hear how you have or will use the ‘Shark Tank’ framework in your classroom to bring in more student ownership. Please share in the comment section.

Using Google Draw to Create Manipulatives and Tasks

“Manipulative’s are a tool for instruction, yet teachers tend to not use them due to lack of education and confidence of their effectiveness to increase learning.” (Green, Flowers, & Piel, 2008).

With more and more Chromebook’s coming into school districts it is important to make sure our students are using them for creation verse consumption of knowledge. A great way for students to show creation is in Google Drawing App. Teachers and/or students can create manipulatives, task or games based on the skills they are learning. Below are a few examples along with how to create these in Google Draw.

1. Let’s Go Shopping: This is an example for our a second grade money task. The students must show how much money would represent what they are buying. They can do a screencast* to share their thinking as they are creating.

Screen Shot 2015-02-15 at 9.22.01 AM

2. Water Cycle: This is an example a student created based on the water cycle. The student created the water cycle images, label the correct terms and then did a screencast* explaining their thinking. For younger grades they can do a screen shot.

Screen Shot 2015-02-15 at 9.21.36 AM

 

3. Base Ten: Here I created a virtual base ten task. The students have to create the number by using the base ten virtual manipulatives and explain their thinking through a screencast*.

Screen Shot 2015-02-15 at 9.22.46 AM

Here is my folder of Google Draw templates I have created or I have found, click here to add them to your Google Drive.  They will only look like an image until add them to your drive, then you can edit and see more of the details.

*Screencast: We use the Google Extension Snag-it. (If you are in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, this extensions is put on all Chromebooks. All the students need to do to create the screencast is click the blue S to the right of the url window.)

How to Create Manipulatives in Google Draw: 

1. Decide what type of manipulative you need and brainstorm what the goal of the task is for the students. (Example: For the Let’s Go Shopping task I created above. I wanted to see if they could create the correct combinations to pay for the items.)

2. Then log into your GAfE account, go to your drive and click on new (you will have to go to the arrow where it says more to find Google Draw) click on draw.

3. Right click on the blank grey and white grid/canvas to choose a background color you would like to use.

4. Now you build your manipulatives or games the way you would like. Under the insert tab are where you can put pictures, create shapes and text boxes.

Here are a few other ideas you can create manipulative/tasks for but not limited too….

Math: fraction number line, quadrilateral chart, ten frame, clock/time etc

Reading: story maps, word sorts, vocabulary, brainstorming/mind-map etc.

Science: periodic table, cell diagram, rock cycle etc

Social Studies: history timeline, infographic, graphic organizers such as for cause & effect

Other Resources for Using Manipulative’s:

Alice Keeler Website

Graphic Organizers with Google Drawings

 Google Drawings Support

I would love to know how you use Google Drawing in the Classroom, please share in the comments.

Hexagonal Thinking with Think Link

” The world we have created is a product of our thinking; it cannot be changed without changing our thinking.” By Albert Einstein

I had one of those days recently when I went down the internet rabbit hole and got lost. I don’t know how I got to learning about Hexagonal Thinking but I love the concept. Hexagonal Thinking is a creative way to show connections within concepts, a type of  ‘thinking map’ that allows students to visualize their thinking process.  In one of my many readings on the topic I came across Kristian Still and that is where I found my new favorite web tool, Think Link by Triptico, not to be confused with Thinglink (another favorite web tool, see previous blog post).

Think Link is FREE and user-friendly. To create a board start be clicking on ‘new board’. Then click on the plus sign to add a hexagon. Type in the term/word you would like to use. Repeat until all your thoughts are on the board. (*Note: Every time you make a new hexagon, you need to drag and drop it to the location you want it on the board or they will all pile up in the same original spot). Double click on the hexagon and you can add notes such as a definition. Use the wrench to delete a hexagon or save them.

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 12.24.51 PM

When using hexagonal thinking in the classroom have students start by brainstorming a concept such as leadership or with a driving question. You can also use as a way to have students take notes or understand how vocabulary is connected. You don’t need to use the computer program to incorporate hexagonal thinking, students can use hexagonal post its or draw them on their paper/notebook themselves.

Reasons Why I like Hexagonal Thinking:

1. It allows students to utilize 21st century skills with their learning. (4 c’s= collaborate, create, communicate and critical think)

2.  When you make a list, sequence or work in boxes the thinking is linear. Hexagon thinking allows for creative thinking.  (Literally allowing students to ‘think outside the box’)

3. Hexagonal thinking allows for student voice.

4. You can use it within all content areas and for any grade level (see video below of Hexagonal thinking in K). Here are some examples using essential questions:

  • Science: What are the relationships between forces and motion?
  • Math:  How is geometry used in the real world?
  • Literacy: What does the ___________ (book title) teach us about life?
  • History: How have ancient Greeks affected our society?
  • PE: How can sports advertising affect teen’s choices?
  • Art:  How do people express themselves through art today?
  • CTE or Technology Class: How would our culture be different without computers?

Other Resources on Hexagonal Thinking:

Design Thinking: Synthesis 1: Hexagonal Thinking

SOLO Hexagons

What computers can’t do: hexagonal thinking

I would love to know how you have used Hexagonal Thinking or Think Link in your classroom. Please share in the comments.

Mystery Skype

“It is the dim haze of mystery that adds enchantment to pursuit.” By Antoine Rivarol

Guest Blog Post by Megan Mehta

We were a few weeks away from a unit centered on the 5 Themes of Geography, and my options were looking like either a) pull the info from the textbook, or b) do something the kids would be excited about.  So I started doing some research and some thinking and this is what I came up with:

We would still use the 5 Themes framework, but I wanted them to branch out beyond the borders of North Carolina.  I also wanted them to work collaboratively while sustaining interest in a project that was going to span a few weeks. I began with a regional map of the United States:

Picture

I split up the kids and let them choose their regions.  Each and every group was excited about their region because someone had some connection to a state, so we were off to a great start!  The next step was to figure out a way to organize our information.  We are a BYOD school, but not all of my kids have devices, so we discussed ways to keep track of our learning and research and decided on a common graphic organizer:

Picture

Hey! That’s only 4 themes! I decided to omit the “movement” theme for the purpose of this unit, as we will be learning about it later in the year.  Anyway, we discussed the themes as they related to Charlotte, North Carolina, and began with Location.  They immediately realized that finding the absolute location of their region was going to be tricky. One group’s solution was to do it just for the capital cities in their respective states; the other groups declared them geniuses, and everyone was happy with the solution. For relative location, some groups chose to describe it for the capital cities, some chose to focus on the region itself.

We went through each of the remaining themes like this: I modeled, they applied. I assessed them with a simple rubric of 3 (mastered), 2 (partially mastered) and 1 (not mastered), and provided support where needed. I expected to be tearing around the room with my hair on fire, but the kids were really into this and did an amazing job of working collaboratively.

We finished our graphic organizers (this took about 4-5 class periods of 45 minutes each) and I was (fairly) confident we were ready to set up our first Mystery Skype. I found a list of jobs and tweaked it to meet our class needs. What we ended up with was this:

1 note taker (records the clues on paper)

2 tweeters (to live tweet the event, of course!)

3 moderators (the faces of our class– asked the questions from the inquirers and relayed answers to the mappers)

4 state experts (answered the questions from the other class)

3 inquirers (asked questions based on the mappers’ notes)

4 mappers (used maps of the U. S. and Google Earth to narrow down the other class’ location)

2 photographers (used iPads to document the experience)

For the first call, I assigned the jobs but in subsequent ones, I have had them pull them out of a hat (a fancy word for “quart-sized storage bag”) and given the option to trade.

To set up the call, I turned to the Great and Powerful Twitter. Within hours, we had three classes wanting to connect. I learned quickly that scheduling can be a challenge with our regimented days, but with some creative rearranging we managed to find a time to connect with a class in Iowa. I told them from the get-go that we were completely new to this in case we breached some Mystery Skype protocol or etiquette that we were unaware of. We took our cues from them and we were off and running! Their first question asked us if we were in the U.S. and where we were in relation to the Mississippi River. It took all I had to restrain myself and let the kids figure out the strategy! I’d like to say that everyone stuck to their job and their assigned classroom area the whole time and everything went perfectly… However… we had sound issues which made it all much more difficult than it should have been. We couldn’t get skype to work on our desktop, so we were using an iPad. The speakers I had weren’t working, so the only audio we had were the tiny sounds coming from the iPad speakers. In a room full of excited 8 year olds, this is not ideal. At one point, I was leaning in to the speaker to listen, not realizing my face was right in the camera. Not exactly the big screen debut I was hoping for, and I’m pretty sure I reappeared in a subsequent nightmare or two because that was one intense close-up. Also, the kids were SO excited that they were (of course) all over the room, talking over each other, doing each other’s jobs, and often doing everything but paying attention to the clues. BUT, we made it! After 45 minutes, they had guessed our location and we figured out theirs (with a little help).

In all, it was and continues to be an amazing learning experience for these kids. They are learning so much about U. S. geography, and thrilled about connecting with other kids across the country. We will definitely continue this throughout the year! If you are looking to connect with us, our Twitter handle is @MehtasBESpandas.

**Update! This process has evolved throughout the year, and I’m sure it will continue to do so next year. I’ve since added the job of “back channellers” where we set up a room on TodaysMeet.com and ask questions about how many kids they have in their school or class, what their school mascot is, etc. We also use Google maps to find out how long it would take us to travel to their school by car. Something we may do next year is come up with a short bio about us and the Charlotte area to use as a wrap up or conversation starter once the locations have been correctly identified. We also need to talk about time zones and the 13 original colonies– both those questions came up a few times and stymied our state experts. I’ve also learned that guessing the state is the easy part– guessing the town or city is really tough! I think the biggest take-away I have from doing these this year are how quickly my kids took over and rocked it out. There was a lot of initial coaching, but by the end of the year, THEY were the ones taking the lead, keeping each other in check, critically thinking, and collaborating. And no one will ever be able to say one of our Pandas can’t find xyz on a map of the U.S.!

Ways to Use Canva in the Classroom

“Every child is an artist, the problem is staying an artist when you grow up” By Pablo Picasso

I used to spend hours using photoshop and other similar graphic design tools to create graphics for my classroom. Not anymore because I am now using Canva; a FREE new simple graphic design web tool that I am loving. It is user friendly and simple to use.

Canva is loaded with templates that you can simply drag and drop your content information from images to text. There is one millions stock photos and text options for you to use plus you can also import images from your documents to produce more specific content. You can create posters, presentations, blog graphics and social media graphics. There are many tutorials for those that also want to learn more about graphic design ‘rules’.  You can even have others edit  your canvas by clicking on the link and publish button and then clicking anyone with this link can edit. Once you have competed your graphic design, you can publish it many ways such as a link, image (see example below), PDF or using social media.

Below is 5 ways you can use Canva in your classroom:

1. Students can create a persuasive poster for the book they have read to entice others to read it. The student will be using their 21st century skills (communication, critically thinking, creating and collaboration) about what content needs to be in the poster.

2. Students can create graphic visuals and ‘app smash’ it with Thinglink.

3. Students can create presentations on the topic they are working on in any subject.

*Bonus: Teachers can create posters for any event such as publishing party, parent teacher conference information or any other school event. Teachers can also use Canva to promote what is happening in their classroom.

*Please not in Canvas terms of use: “Canva is a great service to use for creating your designs, but you have to be at least 13 years of age and fully able to form binding contracts in order to use it. You may not use the Service in violation of these terms or any laws or regulations.” This means you will have to have parent permission for students under 13.

I would love to know how you could use this tool in your classroom?

Edulum 14

 

 

%d bloggers like this: