Posts tagged ‘#21stedchat’

ICYMI: Think It Up

“I like the challenge of trying different things and wondering whether it’s going to work or whether I’m going to fall flat on my face.” By Johnny Depp

On Friday all three major networks, CBS, NBC and ABC, aired a live show called Think It Up. (If you missed it, watch it. It gave me chills and hope that we are moving in the right direction) Think It Up inspires public school students in grades 7-12 to pursue their passions through student-powered, teacher-led learning projects. They have partnered with donors choose and others such as Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in order to help support educators and change classrooms. You can also follow them on Facebook and Twitter. To get started with Think It Up Educators go to thinkitup.org/getstarted

Other great opportunities to bring to the classroom that Think It Up referred to are below:

Just Keep Livin

Global Citizenship

Project XQ

Change Makers

*ICYMI = In Case You Missed It – They also featured this video that has been popular on YouTube called Teaching Center

More than 60% of the jobs of the future don’t even exist yet…are you preparing your students for your world or theirs?

Being Aware of Stereotype Threats

“People are incapable of stereotyping you; you stereotype yourself because you’re the one who accepts roles that put you in this rut or in this stereotype.” Eva Mendes

Researchers say if we reduce stereotype threats, we will reduce achievement gaps in all areas. Stereotype threat refers to the risk of confirming negative stereotypes about an individual’s racial, ethnic, gender, or cultural group. (1) This is not a new term as Steele and Aronson in 1995 rekindle the discussion that original started in 1965 and recently has come back into the forefront. Always campaign #LikeAGirl (see video below) has started a new movement around stereotype threat.

I believe we can reduce the stereotype threat by being aware of it. Below are more resources that can help you in the classroom decline the stereotype threat.

Stereotype Threat: Definition, Examples & Theories 

How to Expel Hurtful Stereotypes from Classrooms across the Country

Stereotype Threat and education.com 

Reducing StereoType Threat 

Resources/Sites for Girls and STEM that I have collected

Please share any resources you have around stereotype threat in the comments.

(1.) “Stereotype Threat – The Glossary of Education Reform.” 2013. 15 Aug. 2015 <http://edglossary.org/stereotype-threat/>

#21stedchat Couldn’t Receive #bammyawards Without All of You

“Perhaps the greatest threat facing all educators today is the relentless national criticism of America’s public schools. The national narrative that is driving the negative public perception of education is leading to a decrease in public confidence and calls for reduced financial support. Today, educators face intense scrutiny and criticism, while what is right in American education is largely ignored.” Bammy’s Creators

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It is hard to believe David Prindle and I started #21stedchat in August of 2012, almost three years ago!  We started the chat because we wanted educators to create a positive 21st century learning environment for students by sharing resources and ideas that has worked in our classrooms and educational experiences. We have been more than pleased with how well it has gone and it has truly made me a better educator.

To this day David and I  have never physically met. We come from different worlds, David is a high school Forensic Science and General Chemistry teacher in MI, while I have taught mostly elementary in NC, but that doesn’t matter because along with all our #21stedchat members we all care about doing what’s best for students. Each week we have a different themes to discuss and in case you haven’t joined us for #21stedchat, it takes place every Sunday from 8:00-9:00 PM EST on Twitter.

We are humbled and honored to be nominated in the best Twitter Chat Community category.  We were nominated by the academy and we couldn’t have done it without all of our #21stedchat members. We want to thank you and ask that you please take a few minutes to vote for us here:  

It Takes a Village to Educate a Child

The Bammy Awards is a cross-discipline award that identifies and acknowledges the good work being done all across the education village. The Bammy Awards was created in response to the tremendous national pressure on educators and education leaders to improve student outcomes, the impact of high-stakes accountability and the intense scrutiny that today’s educators face.

The awards aim to foster cross-discipline recognition of the collective contributions being made to educate children, encourage collaboration in and across the various domains, elevate education and education successes in the public eye, and raise the profile and voices of the many undervalued and unrecognized people who are making a difference in the field.

The Bammy Awards acknowledge that teachers can’t do it alone and don’t do it alone. The Awards aim to recognize the collaborative nature of education, to encourage respect in and across the various domains, to raise the profile and voices of the many undervalued and unrecognized people who are making a difference in the field and to elevate educators, education and the value of life-long learning in the public eye.

Integrating Social Emotional Curricula and the Common Core

“Learning is a result of listening, which in turn leads to even better listening and attentiveness to the other person. In other words, to learn from the child, we must have empathy, and empathy grows as we learn.” By Alice Miller

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Tonight’s #21stedchat (On Twitter Sundays @ 8:00 PM EST US with @dprindle and I – @Edu_Thompson) is discussing Social Emotional Curriculum vs. Integrated Empathy. This is apart of what I refer to as ‘hidden curriculum’. To me there shouldn’t be a ‘verse’ between Social Emotional Curriculum/Integrated Empathy tonight but an ‘and’.

Developing students’ social and emotional skills helps schools/classrooms create safe learning environments that help increase academic achievement. I believe that empathy falls within social emotional curriculum and it should be integrated into the Common Core with a focus on 21st century skills so it is cohesive. Below are some suggestions on how you can integrate social and emotional curricula with Common Core standards. My ideas are based on the An Educational Leaders Guide to Evidence-Based Social and Emotional Learning Programs, Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL, 2013)’ and Common Core.

  • Self-Awareness/Management: focuses on identifying and recognizing emotions; self-efficacy; control of oneself; self-motivation and discipline; goal setting; and organizational skills. Connection to Common Core:  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  • Relationship Skills: encompasses communication; social engagement and relationship building; working cooperatively; negotiation; conflict management; and help seeking. Connection to Common Core: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • Responsible Decision Making: includes problem identification and problem solving; evaluation and reflection; personal, social, and ethical responsibility. Connection to Common Core: CCSS.Math.Practice.MP1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Social Awareness: empathy; difference recognition; and respect for others. Connection to Common Core: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

There are many other Common Core Standards that these social and emotional basic skills can be integrated with. Many of these skills can also be taught and discussed within books, history and the arts. Below are more resources on this topic:

Social and emotional learning gaining new focus under Common Core

Building Social and Emotional Skills in Elementary Students: Empathy

Empathy: the Key to Social and Emotional Learning

Teaching Social and Emotional Skills in Schools

CASEL website

I would to hear ways that you think social and emotional curricula should be integrated or how you have integrated it. Please share in the comments section

5 Tips in Getting Parents Involved

“A positive parent-teacher relationship helps your child feel good about school and be successful in school” by Diane Levin, Ph.D.

partnership

One of the most important things a school can do to help raise student achievement scores is getting parents involved. There needs to be a partnership  between school and parents, working together to better the students academic lives. How can you get parents involved? Below are my top 5 ways.

1. Ask: Often times educators don’t ask parents about volunteering because they don’t want to impose on a parent. Using a site like SignUp Genius, allows parents to sign up for what they feel comfortable doing and have time for. Having multiple volunteer opportunities from brining in snacks, to helping with filing, to creating a bulletin board gives all parents options.

2. Website: Every educator should have a website that has basic information for the parents such as grading polices, helpful websites and class schedule. Embed calendars so parents can record upcoming events, assignments and dates to check to help their children’s progress is also beneficial. If your school doesn’t supply you with a website option, you can create free owns with Weebly, Google Sites  or Wix.

3. Social Media: Communication is huge in getting parents involved and having a school Facebook Page and Twitter is a great way for parents to stay updated.  Don’t believe me: check out these Facebook Stats. Here is a schools Faceebook page from Charlotte, NC: Grand Oak Elementary and a Twitter Page from New Jersey: New Milford HS.

4. Workshops: Having professional development for parents helps them feel comfortable with curriculum and programs helps build trust. An example of workshops that you can have are BYOT  or Common Core so parents can see how they are implemented.

5. Having a Space for Parents: Designing a space for parents helps parents feel welcomed and apart of the school. This space also allows the parents to help the school or teacher without getting in the way of the students learning.

Want more information of getting parents involved read: Education World: Parent Involvement in Schools. Please share any successful tips that have worked for you in the comment section.

 

 

Problem, Brain, Challenged Based Learning…Oh My! Distinguishing Between the Methods

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” by Albert Einstein

Thinking

Fill in the blank and you have heard about some type of ‘based learning’. With all these different terms and methods it is hard to distinguish one from the other.  Many overlap and this post will be my attempt to help distinguish between them all and provide resources if you want to learn more.

Problem Based Learning: (PBL) is student centered instruction where the student learns the content through solving different problems. If you want to get started  or learn more about Problem based learning here is a good site and PBL book

Project Based Learning: (PBL) is where students create a product based on an essential content question being posed. If you want to get started  or learn more about Project based learning here is a good site and PBL book

Challenge Based Learning: (CBL) is Apple’s approach at looking at a big idea and having the students explore and find a real world solution using technology. If you want to get started  or learn more about Challenge based learning here is a good site and CBL book.

Brain Based Learning: (BBL) is taking what we know about the brain, about development and about learning and combining those factors in intelligent ways to connect and excite students’ desire to learn. If you want to get started  or learn more about Brain based learning here is a good site and BBL book.

Passion Based Learning: is allowing students to study what they are passionate about. If you want to get started or learn more about Passion based learning here is a good site and  book.

Game Based Learning: (GBL) is when students learn through playing games. If you want to get started or learn more about Game based learning here is a good site, blog and  book.

Resource Based Learning: (RBL) is an instruction which gives importance to the role of resources in the teaching and learning process. If you want to get started or learn more about Resource based learning here is a good site and RBL book.

Experience Based Learning: (EBL) is learning through experience through critical and reflective thinking. If you want to get started or learn more about Experience based learning here is a good site and article.

Discovery Based Learning: (DBL) is having students learn through discovery. If you want to get started  or learn more about  Discovery based learning here is a good article and DBL book.

Inquiry Based Learning: (IBL) is learning through explanation and discovery. If you want to get started or learn more about Inquiry based learning here are two good sites by Northeastern Illinois University and Concepts to Classroom along with this IBL book.

Technology Based Learning: (TBL) is the infusion of technology and the curriculum. There is a Technology Based Learning book but TBL should be incorporated in all learning styles.

No matter what, as educators, we must engage all learners and equip them with the skills for the 21st century. I suggest student centered learning which is doing what is best based on the student. Yes, that could mean 8 different lesson plans but isn’t that why we are in education, to do what’s best for them!

Applying 21st Century Skills with Common Core and Trading Cards

“Critical thinking is thinking about your thinking while you’re thinking in order to make your thinking better.”  by Richard Paul

My new favorite FREE tool for the classroom, for grades 3-12, is Trading Cards; which is an iOS App and also web based  by ReadWriteThink. This tool is user-friendly  and allows students to practice 21st century skills with integration of Common Core Curriculum. The Trading Card tool gives students a choice to demonstrate their literacy knowledge by creating a trading card about a real or fictional character.

When you use this tool in the classroom, the learners apply all their 21st century skills. The students  have to….

– critically think about the information they need to write in each section. The sections have guiding questions to help the students if they need it.

– communicate the information in 120 characters or less per section.

– create the card adding a picture of the character they are describing.

– collaborate if you have the students work together.

The tool is user friendly and the creator can chose different backgrounds/designs and can also organize the cards by putting them in different collections. My favorite feature is that you can also share the cards multiple ways. One way is you can download them to your camera roll and then upload them to Edmodo or Gaggle accounts and have class discussions about the cards. Having students create cards based on characters in their books help them think about perspective in a creative way. This is also a great way for students to reflect on a biography they have read to synthesize the information.  There are a lot of lesson plans already created for grades 3-12, check them out here.

Here is the one I created on Steve Jobs on my iPad, then saved it to my camera roll.

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If you have used ReadWriteThink- Trading Cards in the classroom I would love to know how; please share in the comment section.

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