“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” By Helen Keller

If you are in education you have heard the term PLC which stands for Professional Learning Communities. Every school should have them as it’s a great way to help improvement teachers practices and increase student learning. Strong PLCs ensure equity of resources for students and redesign learning to accommodate the students needs.

PLC involves much more than a group of teachers getting together to discuss their lesson plans or data. Instead, a PLC should represent a focus on continuous improvement in staff performance as well as student outcomes. If teachers are working together in PLCs answering these questions then they are working towards a more Personalized Learning environment for their classrooms. According to Rick DuFour, the guru of PLCs, the four critical questions of a PLC include:

  1. What do we want all students to know and be able to do?
  2. How will we know if they learn it?
  3. How will we respond when some students do not learn?
  4. How will we extend the learning for students who are already proficient/shown mastery?

I would tweak these questions to provide support to help educators change their practices in the classroom and to promote more of a personalized instruction by  bringing in the students responses along with a few more I added in green below:

For students during a PLC:

  1. What do I want to know and be able to do?
  2. What dispositions/soft skills will help me accomplish my goal?
  3. How will I know if I learned it?
  4. How will I demonstrated that I have mastered the skill/concept? 
  5. How will I respond when I do not understand the concept or am not learning it? What resources can I turn to?
  6. How will I extend my learning?

Adding student responses into the PLC process starts transforming the agency and shifting practices from a PLC that is student centered to a PLC that is student driven. When PLCs come together to analyze their current reality and make changes to improve upon their practices with students voices at the table; they will not only increase student outcomes but also classroom culture and student motivation.

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