“Learning is more effective when it is active rather than passive process.” Euripides

According to Christensen Institute blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns: (1) at least in part through online learning, with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace; (2) at least in part in a supervised brick-and-mortar location away from home; (3) and the modalities along each student’s learning path within a course or subject are connected to provide an integrated learning experience. There are four different models: Rotation, Flex, A La Carte and Enrichment Virtual Model. There is a difference between blended learning and technology integration, learn more about that from my previous blog post.

 

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Truly understanding the difference within the blended learning models will help make choosing and implementing blended learning in your classroom easier.

Rotation: Students are rotating through stations with at least one station being online. (Most often used)

Flex: Students main way of learning is online. (taking multiple classes)

A La Carte: Some students (not a whole school) take a class that is entirely online but is done inside the school they attend.

Enriched Virtual Model: Students attend class and then do coursework online, on their own time.

In my experience, most teachers use one of the four sub-models based on the rotation model. Below I define the differences between the sub-models.

  • Station Rotation: (Most used and easiest to manage)
    • Takes place in one classroom
    • Usually three stations: 1. Teacher led 2. Online Instruction/Practice 3. Student collaboration
    • Students rotate on a fixed schedule to the different stations that is managed by the teacher (Ex 15 mins per station, the teacher rings a bell and the students move.)
    • Students rotate through all the stations but do different activities based on level
    • Each station is the same content area (ex. everyone is doing math)
    • Teacher led station can be instructions or conferencing
  •  Lab Rotation:
    • Rotation happens through multiple lab/rooms within the school building
    • Students rotate among lab/rooms
    • Each lab/room is usually a different content area
    • One lab/room is online learning
  •  Individual Rotation:
    • Students rotate on an individual schedule based on their pace and needs.
    • Students don’t have to rotate to all the different stations in the room. They go to stations based on their needs as a learner.
    • Typical stations that are set up are: Online area, small group/direct instruction area, group work area and individual work area.
  •  Flipped Classroom:
    • Online delivery of instruction and content is done through video that the students watch at home. Best practice and research shows videos should be no more than 10 mins.
    • During class students are working on an active learning strategy such as injury or project based learning.
    • Sometimes flipped and another sub-model of rotation is used. (Ex: I used flipped and station rotation)
    • Misconception: Homework practice online is flipped learning. (Ex: students using adaptive learning software such as dreambox or a teacher assigning problems for students to do using a learning management system like Edmodo – These are NOT flipped classrooms)

Now that you understand the differences between the blended learning models, chose the one that best fits your classroom. Next week I will share some tips and tricks of managing a blended learning classroom.

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Comments on: "Choosing a Blended Learning Model" (4)

  1. […] by incorporating a rotation model; if you have a few devices or are a BYOT school try a blended learning model such as rotation station. A rotation model allows you as a teacher to teach mini-lessons to small groups verse whole class. […]

  2. I think we can also look at the benefits of using blended learning approaches to meet the needs of adult learners. An A La Carte model can provide opportunities to build capacity around theoretical practices through an online format while providing time to apply practices when gathering in a face to face setting. I would be interested to know what approaches teachers have experienced through professional development that utilizes an A La Carte technique.

  3. […] the computers so the teacher can ‘see’ the management of it. Also show how in a true blended learning model you only need a few computers and offer some tips and […]

  4. Station Rotation does seem to be the most easily adaptive style, especially with limited computers available.

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