“The desire to create is one of the deepest yearnings of the human soul.” By Dieter Uchtdorf

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Makerspaces are a place to create and tinker. More and more educators are seeing the need for makerpaces in schools. Not that long ago I blogged about the 411 on Makerspaces and Makerspace in Education; I felt like it was time to update the list with newer tools and some different sites as makerspaces are always changing!

Tools for your Makerspace:

Watercolorbot

Squishy Circuits

Easybotics

Circuit Cubes

Q-BA-MAZE

Keva Blocks

Block Posters

Parrott Minidrones

Websites/Resources for Makerspaces:

DIY Girls

Make to Learn

Renovated Learning

Invent to Learn

MakerBridge

 

 

“Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun” by Mary Lou Cook

A HyperDoc is a Google document that incorporates different interactive features, such as links to content, maps etc. It requires the creator to think about the needs of the learners, how they will engage in the content, what ways they can reflect on their own learning, and how they can show what they know. A multimedia text set is a collection of lessons, various texts, and resources based around a unit, topic or theme. HyperDocs and Multimedia text sets were created by three ladies, Lisa Highfill, Kelly Hilton and Sarah Landis and have revolutionized the classroom.

How to create a HyperDoc:

  1. Choose your audience (students, teachers, staff)
  2. Choose a standard/topic/theme/unit 
  3. Decide if it is a single lesson (HyperDoc) or a collection of learning resources, example for a unit (Multimedia Text Set)
  4. Create a doc and title it HyperDoc and name of standard/topic/theme/unit
  5. Add images, links, maps, instructions, learning experiences etc 
  6. Be sure to set the share settings to view only so leaners can make a copy.
  7. There are multiple places to share your HyperDoc with other educators such as the below padlet or to Teachers Give Teachers.

HyperDocs are a great way to create personalized learning playlists and/or pathways. It is also a misconception that only teachers can create/use HyperDocs. It is a great way for administrators to model a way to integrate technology in a meaningful way for example in staff meetings or as a way to deliver professional development. Check out this link for HyperDocs for Administrators!

Made with Padlet

 

More resources on HyperDoc’s:

The HyperDoc Handbook: Digital Lesson Design Using Google Apps

Meet the HyperDoc Girls and Their Resources

HyperDocs Site

Collection of HyperDoc Examples from 2nd-12

Collection of Multimedia Text Sets

“Creativity involves breaking out of established patterns in order to look at things in a different way.” Edward de Bono

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This week my blog post is different because I want you to read Tony Vincent‘s blog post, Print Custom Sticky Notes with Google Slides. It is chock full of amazing ideas, tips, tricks and templates for you to utilize in your classroom. The directions are clear, concise and so easy you could implement this tomorrow in your classroom. Happy reading!

“Action is the foundational key to all success.” By Anthony Robbins

Last week I talked about why we need to Reframe a Paradigm for Professional Learning. This week I share with you some ideas of how to do this in your schools/districts. We should be modeling what you want to see changed in the classroom. Here are three ways to model.

Face to Face (F2F): Traditionally in a F2F professional development it is a sit and get and the instructor teachers to the average. In a F2F professional learning educators should take a pre-assessment and the instructor should use that data to drive the instruction and next steps. Just because it is F2F doesn’t mean it should be one and done; this is a misconception. F2F should meet throughout the year, just like a classroom, but they should not sit through lessons/skills they already know.

Virtual:  Virtual allows for anytime, self paced choice for educators to choose what they want to learn based on their needs. 

Micro-Credentials: Micro-credentials allows educators to receive ‘badges’ signifying mastery of  a specific skill. This is a ‘newer’ concept in education. Learn more about Micro-credential from these school districts that are using it: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Personalized Learning Department, Kettle Moraine School District and Surry County

Six ways to offer professional learning that are not sit-and-get with resources to learn more on how to implement.

Here are three other ideas:

  • Teacher and/or Student Showcase: Have educators and/or students ‘share’ and ‘showcase’ something that is working well in the classroom. I have seen this done many different ways such as through old schools science fair style or through Ted Talk style approaches.
  • Innovate Time: This is time you allow teachers to research something they are interested in implementing in the classroom. The Principal or another administrator teaches the class so the teacher ‘gains’ time to do this research.
  • Project Based Learning (PBL): Educators can do action research to help improve their classroom instruction.

Do you have other ways that you, your school or district are doing professional development differently? I would love to hear about it in the comments.

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning. ” By Benjamin Franklin

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The research on professional development shows that the older “drive‐by” workshop model does not work. We also know that no two people learn the same way;  yet many of us do not change the way we provide instruction for students nor professional development for teachers. 

Just as we personalize education for students, we must also personalizing professional learning for adults. Notice I said professional learning, this is because I want to make a clear distinction between professional development and professional learning because to me, PD is a one and done verse professional learning improves educators professional knowledge, competence, skill and effectiveness. 

Best practices for personalized professional learning closely parallels best practices for personalized learning for students. There are three key pieces we should be doing with professional learning opportunities for educators:

  1. Content: We need to relate the content to the classroom/school just like we relate content to real world for students as this is an educators ‘real world’. We also need to provide the learning goal and how it relates to the educator. For example explaining how it connects to their teacher evaluation.
  2.  Data and Feedback: We need to meet educators where they are and we can use data to do that. Having educators take a pre-assessment on the topic of the professional learning will allow the educator to start where they should. Educators should also be able to ‘test out’ of professional learning opportunities if they can show mastery of the skill, competence etc.
  3. Learning Environment: We need to rethink time, duration, and frequency of professional learning. Professional learning should be continuous and ongoing, involving follow‐up and support meeting the teacher where they are in their teaching craft. Educators should have the option/choice of face to face, virtual or blended professional learning opportunities so they can learn in their best environment.

Here is an example of professional learning based on these three key pieces. If you want educators to learn about morning meeting you need to have a goal for the content: Example – I will be able to effectively implement Morning Meeting into my classroom. This correlates to standard II of the North Carolina Evaluation. Then you need to provide the option of allowing educators to show they have mastered this topic. This can be done multiple ways for example they can provide a video of them implementing morning meeting or they can have someone do an observation while they are conducting a morning meeting. For the educators that don’t ‘test out’ we need need to have a pre-assessment to see where educators are in their understanding of morning meeting.  We need to use this data to place educators in the correct professional learning path based on their needs.

Next week I will share some of the other ways we can reframe the paradigm for professional learning!

 

“Most schools have been designed to solve yesterday’s problems, rather than capitalizing on Today’s Opportunities to Effectively confront the issues of tomorrow.” Unknown

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In order to help Personalized Learning (PL) grow in schools and districts we must try to remove the barriers that challenge those we serve. To do this well, it is always great to do a barrier protocol so that we can be pro-active. Many times we get stuck in what we have always done so it is great to ask others. Here is my previous blog post on barrier protocol and below are some PL barriers and how to overcome them: 

  • Funding: Yes, is it nice to have money to help fund PL but you can do it on a very little budget.
    • We should look closely at what we already have in our schools and districts and ask ourselves: How might we change what we have to be more of a student-driven learning environment? For example you can utilize the teacher leaders in your building that are already trying to move to a more PL environment by having them lead PD on how they implemented ____ (fill in blank). For example if a teacher started with changing their learning environment with furniture and students choosing their seating, let them do a PD on how they did it. Utilize the other people in your building such as facilitators by having them coach teachers to change their craft to a more student-driven environment.
    • To often we think we need funding for PL because we have to get devices for the students but we can start small until the funding is there because technology is a tool to help but PL can be done without technology.
    • Look at other funding sources besides the school/district budget such as grants, PTA and/or fundraisers. Have you tried: GetEdFunding, Go Fund Me Education or these grants.
  • It is overwhelming or it won’t work with ____: We need get to the root cause of what is being said is overwhelming or won’t work. For example I often hear time is a reason that it is overwhelming or won’t work. When you start getting to the root cause of time it is usually because individual/teams are not maximize their time. For example, planning is one area many educators do not use their time wisely. Setting an agenda is helpful to stay on task and not end up talking about what you did over the weekend or what you are going to do over the weekend etc. Also dividing and conquering tasks by standards. For example have one teacher come up with three tasks for 6.EE.1 and someone else 6.EE.2  and share resources. Work smarter, not harder! To also make sure it does not get overwhelming, educators should take small action steps to make the changes to a student driven/PL Environment.
  • We don’t have buy-in with teachers: You might never get consensus but you will have momentum. To help educators have buy-in explain the WHY we need PL. The current structure of the school day is obsolete. Created during the Industrial Age, the assembly line system we have in place now has little relevance to what we know kids actually need to thrive. If education leaders refuse to evaluate and stay in touch with students need our institution will fail, just like businesses that don’t keep up with changing customers. 
  • We don’t have buy-in with parents: Explain the why to parents helps too but other ways you can get buy-in with parents is by having them be apart of the process. Another way is by address misconceptions parents might have such as students at the computer all day doing Khan videos. Helping parents understand and letting them seeing how that is not the case can be done by having parent tours of your school building and parent workshops on PL.
  • It is one more thing to do: There are a few ways to address this barrier:
    1. PL should not be an add-on but a replacement. For example: Instead of you leading a student conferring/conference, replace that with letting the student led it.
    2. Start by showing educators what they are doing well in their room that meets the PL philosophy such as if they are already allowing students to goal set or reflect.

Try to remove barriers and constraints to allow for innovation and change. We need to move beyond compliance and break the silos, be the change you wish to see!

“Our current landscape of education: People are making decisions about our profession, who have not been in our profession.” by Benjamin Shuldiner

Last weekend I was fortunate enough to go to ASCD #Empower17 Conference. This conference is always a favorite because not only do I get to meet up with my ASCD Emerging Leaders, Authors and other educators from around the world but I ALWAYS learn new things. Here are my top take-aways from the conference in no particular order:

1. Students at the Center by Carol Ann Tomlinson (ie Differentiation Guru)

Carol Ann believes in Personalized Learning( PL) and that it is not the same as differentiation! I know what you are thinking, this is not something that you learned as you have been saying this for years but what was new was hearing it from her mouth! She also stated many other facts that I have been saying but was nice to hear such as:

  • Technology is not the answer, relationships are!
  • PL requires effective teaching first!
  • The teacher is not the keeper of the knowledge but the facilitator of resources and should support the students needs to reach mastery!

*The aha moment I did have in her session was when she said: “Changing schools is hard. I have been teaching, training and talking about differentiation for 20 years and many educators still don’t understand it. PL is going to take years for all educators to understand as well.” 

2. PL with Habits Of Mind by Allison Zmuda and Bena Kalick

I always go to Allison Zmuda’s session even though she’s now a friend and educational though partner that I talk to often because I always learn something new.

  • Life does not work on a pacing guide…neither should a classroom.
  • Don’t wait until the end product for expert feedback. Provide this support when students still have time to learn, play and explore.
  • Average teachers teach until the student gets it right. Above average teachers teach until the student can’t get it wrong.

3. Creating Schools that Work for Kids’ presented by Eric Sheninger.

Eric has a book that recently came out called UnCommon Learning: Creating Schools That Work for Kids, but I have not read it. I did learn:

  • Focus on the what ifs, not the yea buts.
  • Unless you get instructional design right, technology can only increase the speed and certainty of failure. by William Horton (so true and good reminder)

4. 5 Teacher Behaviors That Prepare Students to Lead by Tammy Musiowsky

Tammy asked great reflective questions to help educators think about their practice:

  • What is a behavior of yours that limits the student-led potential in your classroom?
  • How do your students know you trust them? If your students know you trust them, how does this allow them to take a greater ownership of their classroom?
  • What is something you learned recently while working with your students?
  • How explicitly and consistently do you name the skill students are working on?

5. Other great blog posts, resources and tweets from #Empower17:

  • I learned about Bluford Series – great books to add into a classroom library for secondary students.

    All things are difficult before they are easy. – Thomas Fuller 

  • Resources for Effective Student Feedback
  • Tweets:
    • Don’t let a program dictate a child’s needs, let the child’s needs dictate the program.”  – @DinaBrulles
    • You’ve got to be in the classrooms everyday, or you can’t improve their performance! Both Ts and Ss. via @ToddWhitaker

    • “Learning isn’t personal if every student is an island in the classroom.” via @thomascmurray

    • Student Voice is not an event, a class period, or something cute to do. It is a WAY OF BEING! via @DrRussQ

 

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